Business Management

We often think of our Business Management practice as the "Oh! You do that,,, too?" segment of our operation. Through our Business Management segment, we offer a wider range of services than the rest of our companies and operations combined. 

We focus where our strengths lie: Our Business Management segment concentrates on your operations, finance, and governance. We take a Conception-to-Succession approach that emphasizes long-run stability, sustainability, and creation of stakeholder value. We operate in conformity with your long-term goals and within your company values and culture.

Many of the services we perform integrate smoothly with services we provide through our other segments. The net result: We provide a cross-disciplinary, seamless spectrum of service that spans the breadth of you business' financial and operational life. 

We don't do everything. If you require marketing, branding, design, advertising, or sales assistance we work closely with a long list of outside consultants we can call upon and support those you already know - but we delegate the workflow to folks who do it better than we do.

“Good management is the art of making problems so interesting and their solutions so constructive that everyone wants to get to work and deal with them.”

~Paul Hawken.

So, What is it we do here?

We find it helps to give examples. As your business matures your role evolves; as Michael Gerber [*1] points out, you can probably be an entrepreneur for only a few months to a year. After that if you want the business to thrive and grow you must become a manager. Later (once you have delegated most of what you can delegate), you must become the inspiration for your company culture and the ideals that drive it.  

As your role evolves the questions you face evolve too. The things you call upon Steven Roy Management to expedite or execute become more complex and "interesting." [*2]

When you open your doors you may crave Start-up Support for (among other things):
 

  • Ideation and Conceptualization: Just what does this new company do? What drives our success?

  • Market Definition and Assessment: Who are our customers? What are their expectations? Will they pay us to meet their expectations? How much will they pay? Are there enough customers to sustain us and make us grow?

  • "Choice of Entity" - and Formation of the Vehicle: What "wrapper" does our conception fit in?

  • Business Licenses, Permits, and Compliance Avenues: Ye Gads - There really are that many?

  • Business System Set-up; Vendors, Cash Handling, Sales-Invoicing, Bill Paying: How will we keep track of our progress, so we can measure it?

  • Business Planning and Plans; Financing and Stakeholder Relations: What are our measurable objectives, goals, and benchmarks. Are we doing as well as we hoped? Is it time to Pivot?

  • Business and Project Modeling/Budgeting Operations: Will we (Do we) have enough cash flow to get by or grow?

  • Capital Structuring, Capital Raising; How are we going to pay for all this? With whose money? What do they want in return?

Start-up is the most "entrepreneurial fun" in a business' (and possibly your) life. Some of us wish it could last forever. [*3] When you are "up and running," yours and Steven Roy Management's focus shifts to managing your enterprise and its growth: This is the Hands on Management phase where you establish stability and encourage growth. To get through it, you may need:

  • CFO Services (Interim or permanent while you Hire, Replace, or Cover this critical function) [*4]

  • Accounting, managerial accounting and after the fact book keeping and payroll [*4]

  • Hands on Management of your company and/or personal finances - A full spectrum service offer [*4]

  • Regulatory and Tax Planning. representation, and compliance: See our Tax Services Page for more details.

  • Project definition and management

  • System design, implementation and execution 

  • Lender and shareholder finance, relations and negotiation

  • Asset acquisition, integration, and operations

  • Employee Systems and personnel evaluation

  • Employee retention and retirement planning

When you and your company mature, your entrepreneurial and hands-on management roles recede. Your leadership and inspirational role expands: Analytics and strategy move to the forefront. Your managers look to you for your "sage advice," The tools of your trade now center on:

  • Entities, Structure and Entity Governance

  • Entity Formation, Merger, and Dissolution; (and the opportunity to relive your entrepreneurial experience)

  • Business and product line extensions;

  • Financial risk assessment/management

  • Capital expenditure & investment analysis;

  • Strategic/Financial Measurement, Analysis, and Planning

  • Profitability and solvency analysis (ratios and trends, break-even, liquidity, return on assets & investments, and sensitivity analysis)
     

And finally

  • Exit Strategy and Succession

Steven Roy Management and Cambyses Financial Advisors LLC would be thrilled to lead or follow you 

Every Step of the Way

[*1] Michael E Gerber; The E-Myth and The E-Myth Revisited: Why Small Businesses Don't Work and What to do About It

[*2] Steven has been known to advise our clients, "If in three years, you are still asking us to do the same interventions we are doing today; you need to fire us. We are not doing our job." A few of our clients out-grew us, some need things we don't provide, but none (that we know of) has exercised this implied option. Our "median business management client" has been with us (and we with them) for over 20 years.

[*3] We did this over 1,100 times before we stopped counting twenty years ago - for us, the the entrepreneurial thrill gets repeated constantly in different contexts.

[*4] We offer CFO and "Back Office" services primarily to service enterprises and companies that do not have extensive manufacturing, wholesale, or retail inventories. Our "ideal client" for these services is an athlete, entertainer, production company, film-theatre festival, or tech firm. 

Caveats: Nothing here should be construed as business, tax or legal advice. The material is general in nature and may not apply to your circumstances. Get qualified counsel before acting on any material you find here.

Visit our Archive-Library

As part of our commitment to client and management practitioner awareness and education we write extensively on topics related to our practice service-matrix (and occasionally on topics that are far-afield from it). Rather than clutter our service pages with things very few people ever read (OK, we acknowledge - a lot of this stuff is just plain boring to other people), we collect the most current of those writings in our Archive - Library.

There, you will find Tax articles, worksheets and checklists with topics that range from: 

  • Everyday: "Should I Incorporate?," "What Entity is Best for Me and the Way I do Business,"

  • Practical: "Should I be In Business at All?," "Where Can I Find Shareholders and Lenders"

  • Exotic: "Can My ESOP Buy my Company," to

  • Public Policy Analysis and Opinion: "Self Directed IRA's = Benefits and Exposures"

You will also find

  • Articles and information that illuminate our other services (e.g. "Why Invest in Real Estate") and

  • Our latest Newsletters (On our Business Practice and our Wealth Practice - Plus our monthly "Critical Date and Procedures Monitor") 

Our Archive-Library materials range from "readily understandable by anyone who can read" to "you'll probably need professional credentials and experience to assimilate this one." You can usually determine which you are looking at by reviewing the footnotes and end-notes. The most referenced articles are designed for our colleagues - in the spirit of cooperation, and in the hope that we can contribute something to our profession. 

Note to our fellows and colleagues: Feel free to use any of our library materials in your own practice - just give us credit (and don't re-publish them without our permission and acknowledgement - that could get nasty). We welcome your feedback, constructive comments, and questions... we sometimes miss the obvious. Your feedback helps remedy that. We view our colleagues as collaborators - not competition. There is plenty of work out there for all of us.

Apropos that last paragraph: Let us know what you do well - especially if it is a service we don't offer. We generate a "steady trickle" of referrals for those services and would be happy to add you to our referral list (after we've vetted you and  gotten to know you a bit). Contact us by email or phone, [818] 489-4228, to start the relationship.